Tag Archives: Ford Theatres

The night I went from selling flamenco fans to becoming one

FORD Merch table Victoria Sela

Victoria Montecillo and Marisela Hughes

by Victoria Montecillo

This past weekend was the biggest event of the summer for the Fountain: Forever Flamenco at the Ford. Since I’ve been working here at the Fountain, this event was something we were all working towards, and I found myself growing more curious and excited to see what all of the fuss was about. As a newcomer, Forever Flamenco sounded like an amazing opportunity to showcase a beautiful and unique art form to the communities of Los Angeles. In the weeks leading up to the big night, everyone in the office kept telling me about the fervor and passion of the flamenco community, and that I had to just wait to see it for myself. No amount of preparation, however, could have prepared me for the experience. 

FORD seats fansOn the day of the show, I came to the venue early with the rest of the Fountain family in order to put out the VIP gift bags (I had spent the weeks leading up to the show working very hard to make sure the bags were all ready and had what they needed, so I was very proud of them), and set up a merchandise table up front. By the time it got to be about two hours before curtain, I started to notice a sizable crowd gathered outside, ready and waiting with picnic baskets. Once the gates opened, people came streaming in, chatting excitedly and eyeing our merchandise and flamenco fans as they passed our merchandise table. And once the gates had opened, the people just kept streaming in. There were people laughing and eating together, and greeting others in what felt like a true community. 

Many of the people who approached our table were loyal, longtime flamenco fans who loved and appreciated the Fountain’s commitment to producing flamenco. Others were drawn to our beautiful fans, where they shared that this was their first flamenco show. It was amazing to see and be able to meet all of the different people that were in attendance at this big event, and to get to feel the pure excitement in the air.

FORD Merch table

Barbara Goodhill, Victoria Montecillo and Marisela Hughes at the merchandise table.

The show itself was truly something to see. With the extent of my knowledge about flamenco being pretty much the dancing lady emoji and the sounds of fervent stomping and complex guitar riffs coming from the rehearsal room of the Fountain that week, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. I certainly could not have anticipated the raw passion and artistic skill that I saw in each of those performers. What I found to be most striking about watching these flamenco musicians and dancers was that each one of them seemed so happy to be there. They were all doing what they loved most, with a group of artists that understood that passion. 

FORD 2016 prod photo 1

On top of that, I could feel the excitement and joy in the crowd around me throughout the show. During each number, the audience would interject with enthusiastic applause, clapping, and excited cheers. Families around me grabbed each other’s shoulders and clasped each other’s hands as they shouted encouragements to the musicians and the dancers as they did what they do best, and I truly felt like I was experiencing a new community full of joy, passion, and celebration. It was a truly unique and amazing experience. 

I am so grateful to everyone at the Fountain, as well as the fantastic team of flamenco artists, for introducing me to the beautiful community of flamenco. I certainly hope I’m able to witness something like this again in my life.

Victoria Montecillo is the Fountain Theatre’s 2016 Summer Arts Intern. We thank the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and the Los Angeles County Arts Commission for their support. 

Creative Community: The arts in LA is an inspiring world unto itself

1by Victoria Montecillo

On June 29, I, along with 131 other LA County Arts Commission interns, attended an arts summit held in Pasadena. Having never before attended a professional-type conference before, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. It seemed like a great opportunity to meet other people in the intern program at different organizations, and learn more about the arts world in LA. I was excited, mainly, to attend my first conference! It all felt very grown-up and professional, and I was excited to learn. 

After checking in at the Pasadena Playhouse and picking which workshops I wanted to attend, I spent the first part of my morning nibbling at a blueberry mini muffin and avoiding small talk. As a naturally introverted person, I’m not one to comfortably strike up casual conversation with strangers; it takes me a little bit to warm up the gears of my social side. Eventually, we all migrated inside the Playhouse for a lovely welcome from the Playhouse’s artistic director, as well as some from the LA County Arts Commission and the mayor of Pasadena. It was certainly very inspiring to be so warmly welcomed and encouraged by people who had found fulfilling work in the arts; they spent the morning encouraging us to follow our passions, and work to create real change. 

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Pasadena Playhouse Artistic Director Sheldon Epps welcomes the interns.

Afterwards, we split into smaller groups and headed to separate locations. My group headed to the Pasadena Museum of California Art, where we got a private welcome and got to explore the work of California artists. We then got a backstage tour of the Pasadena Playhouse, where Playhouse volunteers told us all about the green room, the costume shop, the scene shop, and the library. As someone who absolutely loves seeing the backstage areas of any theatre, I was absolutely thrilled. After that, we walked over to First United Methodist Church, where we saw a beautiful site specific piece by the Jacob Jonas Dance Company. Essentially, we spent the morning being exposed to the different corners of the LA arts world, where we got to meet and talk with artists that were working towards their passions and were excited to share it.

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Victoria Montecillo

For lunch, we got together with our peer groups, a group of other LA County interns from the same geographic area. I got to meet some wonderful people working at a lot of different organizations. Some were working at theaters like me, while others were working for music non-profits or arts-based community outreach organizations. Even though we were in a crowded, noisy room, it was interesting to go around and hear everyone’s stories and where they came from, and how they ended up in this intern program. Some of the people I met were not necessarily interested in working in the arts world, but they were incredibly passionate about working in social justice and reaching out to Los Angeles neighborhoods. Everyone had a different perspective to bring, and different stories about their experiences to share. It was nice to hear about everyone’s experiences as interns, and the kinds of work they were doing. A few people were interested in pursuing graphic design, some were interested in music and arts education, and others were interested in theatre. I liked that we were a good mix among our group of various interests, because it gave us a wide range of perspectives. Alma Villegas, our wonderful Peer Group Leader from artworxLA, led us along our discussion and made sure to check in with all of us on whether or not we were enjoying our internships so far. It was comforting to feel that (other than my Fountain family of course) I had another community to fall back on, that would offer me help and support if I needed it. 

3After lunch, we split up from our peer groups to attend a workshop of our choosing. I attended a workshop on Public Engagement in the Arts, led by some truly inspirational people from Cornerstone Theatre Company and the Ford Theatres. They started off by keeping us on our feet, moving to different corners of the room for different things (e.g. “Move to this corner if you’re the youngest in your family, this corner if you’re the oldest,”), gradually picking more thought-provoking topics before ending with creating a line with one end being “art for art’s sake”, and the other end being “art for social justice”. This made us all think about why we were there, and what drives us. 

We then got to hear from Cornerstone and the Ford Theatres, and more specifically, the kind of work that they do in community engagement. My experience with community engagement from theaters is still quite limited, so it was certainly very educational to hear about the new and original ways other theatres were working to stay engaged with the communities around them. It was amazing to hear about Cornerstone, actually casting and creating shows with members of their community, and going out to neighborhoods and to the people to collaborate on creating a piece of art. And to hear from the Ford Theatres, and their work in spreading cultural awareness through free interactive workshops on dance and song. It was beautiful to see and hear about people in the community excited about the arts, and sharing it with the younger and older generations. 

Afterwards, I went to a session on Equity & Inclusion in the Arts, where we were told about the LA County Cultural Equity and Inclusivity Initiative. It was essentially a “town hall” meeting, where we were invited to share our comments, stories, and suggestions in order to help make change in policies. While it was not exactly what I expected, I learned a lot simply from listening to my peers discuss the challenges and obstacles they had all faced as people of color pursuing the arts. One suggestion that I found incredibly valuable (and, seemingly, somewhat intuitive) was the suggestion to offer opportunities to regularly have open discussions like the one we were having, where people had the chance to express their feelings in a safe environment. Sometimes, the first step to making change is creating the opportunity to discuss these issues openly, where people can feel they are being heard. 

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I want to thank the Los Angeles County Arts Commission and their wonderful internship program, as well as the Fountain Theatre, for giving me such a unique opportunity to meet other inspiring people pursuing fulfilling and meaningful careers in the arts world. I am learning so much more this summer than I ever anticipated.

Victoria Montecillo is our 2016 arts intern this summer at the Fountain Theatre, made possible through the support of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and the Los Angeles County Arts Commission Internship Program.  

‘Forever Flamenco at the Ford’ Makes Live TV Appearance

 

Guitarist Antonio Triana and dancer Maria Bermudez.

Guitarist Antonio Triana and dancer Maria Bermudez.

Flamenco artists Maria Bermudez , Antonio Triana and Pele de los Reyes made an early-morning live TV appearance on  Univision KMEX 34 today to promote our upcoming Forever Flamenco at the Ford Gala Concert at the Ford Amphitheatre this Saturday, June 15th at 8:30pm. 

Univision 34, Los Angeles was the first UHF station in southern California, and the first to broadcast in Spanish in Los Angeles. Univision 34, Los Angeles serves the Hispanic community and offers programs that inform Spanish-speaking viewers about local and global events that educate and entertain.

Hailed as “LA’s most significant venue for flamenco” by LA Weekly, the Fountain Theatre returns to the Ford stage after a two year absence, bringing the finest local, national and international flamenco artists to celebrate this passionate expression of Spanish culture. Forever Flamenco’s dancers, musicians and singers have been delighting audiences for years with the intensity, precision and exhilaration for which flamenco is known. This year’s show pays tribute to the founder of the Fountain’s flamenco program, Deborah Lawlor, a Los Angeles icon and ardent supporter of the art form for more than two decades. 

The Forever Flamenco All-Star line-up includes: Vanessa Abalos * Roberto Amaral * Fanny Ara * Maria Bermudez * José Cortes * Alejandro Granados * Manuel Gutierrez * Joey Heredia * Jason McGuire * Adam del Monte * Timo Nuñez * Rocio Ponce * Ana de los Reyes * Pele de los Reyes * Ismael de la Rosa * Lourdes Rodriguez * Mizuho Sato * Jose Tanaka * Antonio Triana * Linda Vega * Ben Woods * Yaelisa.

Enjoy These Photos from Today’s Live TV Appearance

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Forever Flamenco at the Ford  Saturday June 15  (323) 461-3673  MORE

Meet ‘Forever Flamenco at the Ford’ Dancer Maria Bermudez: “I aspire to inspire, until I expire.”

I grew up with flamenco in the background of my childhood. My older brother Alfonso was bit by the flamenco bug after seeing his first flamenco show passing through town; that was it for him. He went on to study with the masters in Spain and became a promising flamenco dancer. Alfonso danced with an exquisite sensitivity. I believe dance was an escape for him. He was a gay man—not an easy situation in our household. He suffered on many levels. The freedom that flamenco – that art– brings to your life; it’s a place of sanctuary.

Alfonso’s life was cut short.  He succumbed to cancer at the age of 27 and died two years later. I was 16 years old. My interest was also in the arts but as an actor and singer. After his passing I suddenly wanted to study Flamenco. It was as though Alfonso wanted… needed to continue dancing and I became his vessel. All who knew him would say the love of his life was his dancing.

Maria B hands 2011I became obsessed with the art form and after only six months of preparation, I packed my bags and was off to Spain to learn to dance. Or so I thought. I discovered I needed to go much further and deeper, metaphorically and literally, to the place, the source of flamenco. This took me to the deep south of Spain, to gypsy territory, a place I have called home for the last 20 years.
 
This journey, which I am still on, has been full of heart aching challenges and absolutely gratifying moments of triumph. From being treated as an outsider to falling in love with a gypsy and then marrying him. But drip of sweat by drip of sweat, I began winning respect through my dedication and total immersion into the culture.

The amount of emotion involved in flamenco is unparalleled. I feel the freedom of expression through the cry of the singers and the music and through the beauty of the dance. It’s euphoric! The best part is the audience’s connection with flamenco on levels unexpected to them. The response is always love, love, love! It’s all worth it.

Flamenco continues to be the source of my inspiration in life. There is a universal cry that we all can relate to — maybe we all have a gypsy spirit in us.  

I aspire to inspire, until I expire.  

— Maria “ChaCha” Bermudez

Forever Flamenco at the Ford  Saturday, June 15 (323) 461-3673 MORE

New Video: Maria Bermudez “Comes Home” to ‘Forever Flamenco at the Ford’

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Flamenco artist Maria Bermudez  describes her longtime friendship with Fountain Producing Artistic Director Deborah Lawlor, her ongoing artistic relationship with the Fountain Theatre and Forever Flamenco, and her warm affinity for the beautiful outdoor Ford Theatre.

Forever Flamenco at the Ford is a Special Gala Event of World-Class Flamenco Artists on June 15th at the Ford Theatre. An All-Star lineup of Flamenco artists from Spain, from across the United States and Los Angeles come together on stage for the first time to celebrate 20 years of Forever  Flamenco and to honor its founder, Deborah Lawlor. Artist line-up include dancers Fanny Ara, Maria Bermudez, Alejandro Granados (from Spain), Manuel Gutierrrez, Timo Nuñez, Linda Vega and Yaelisa; singer/dancer Roberto Amaral; singers José Cortez, Ana de los Reyes (from Spain) singer/composer Pele de los Reyes (from Spain) of the GRAMMY-nominated group “Navajita Platea”; guitarists Adam del Monte, Jason McGuire, Jose Tanaka, Antonio Triana and Ben Woods; and percussionist Joey Heredia.

Forever Flamenco at the Ford  Sat June 15 (323) 461-3673

The Fountain’s ‘Heart Song’ gives voice to flamenco’s depths

Maria Bermudez in 'Heart Song'.

Maria Bermudez in ‘Heart Song’.

Choreographed by Maria Bermudez, Stephen Sachs’ dance-theater hybrid explores the deep well of emotions that the art form can stir up.

By Susan Josephs

Two years ago Stephen Sachs began working on a play about the philosophy and practice of flamenco. He figured he had all the material he needed, having spent years in close proximity to flamenco dancers as the co-artistic director of the Fountain Theatre, home of the long-running performance series “Forever Flamenco!” But after further research, he realized that the Spanish art form intertwined deeply with certain existential preoccupations that also inhabited his writer’s mind.

Stephen Sachs

Stephen Sachs

“The older I get, the more aware I have become of the loss of loved ones, the time in front of me and how I’m spending it. You start to wrestle more with these things,” observes the 53-year-old playwright and director.

Sachs wound up writing “Heart Song,” a uniquely theatrical hybrid that premieres May 25 at the Fountain and pays tribute to flamenco through the lens of one Jewish woman’s midlife crisis. Directed by Los Angeles theater veteran Shirley Jo Finney and choreographed by the flamenco artist Maria Bermudez, it stars Pamela Dunlap as Rochelle, a fiftysomething New York City denizen who struggles over her mother’s recent death and gets dragged to a flamenco class for nonprofessional dancers by her Japanese American masseuse Tina (Tamlyn Tomita).

Convinced that “Jews don’t do flamenco,” Rochelle receives encouragement from fellow class-taker Daloris (Juanita Jennings), an African American cancer survivor, and reluctantly encounters Katarina de la Fuente, the fierce, Gypsy flamenco teacher played by Bermudez. (Denise Blasor will take over the role after June 15.) Katarina teaches her students how to stomp their feet, flick their wrists and fully express themselves so they can experience the heightened spiritual state known as duende. She also waxes poetic about flamenco’s origins, the shared history of persecution between Gypsies and Jews and the cante jondo, the “deep song” born from suffering and oppression.

Eventually, Katarina’s teachings infiltrate Rochelle’s psyche so that she can grieve and confront the truth of her mother’s legacy.

“What interested me in this whole subject was how art, like religion or any spiritual faith, has the power to transform and heal,” says Sachs, who recently lost his mother and still “wrestles with that loss. I wanted to explore how flamenco can give voice to what is beyond the spoken word, to that deep inner well of sorrow and pain and also joy.”

Deborah Lawlor

Deborah Lawlor

Sachs’ treatment of flamenco, filled with historical and literary references, also feels distinctly educational. This should come as no surprise when considering that the Fountain’s co-artistic director Deborah Lawlor has produced the city’s preeminent flamenco series for some 20 years. “Heart Song,” however, takes the Fountain’s outreach efforts one step further with its potential to simultaneously attract the theater’s two main audiences: traditional playgoers and flamenco fans.

“I don’t think any production has yet explained flamenco as well as ‘Heart Song’ does,” says Lawlor, who served as the play’s dramaturgical consultant and will be honored on June 15 in a “Forever Flamenco!” gala performance at the Ford Theatres in Hollywood. “The play really shows the range of flamenco and its tragic dimensions, which you don’t find in other dance forms.”

Bermudez, who lives in southern Spain and travels all over the world to perform flamenco, agrees that the Fountain’s production “is very unique. In Spain, there have been mountings of flamenco story ballets, but no one has created a drama about flamenco in this way with actors,” she says.

As the show’s choreographer, Bermudez faced the challenge of crafting movement that everyone in the eight-member cast could perform while accurately reflecting flamenco’s essence. For her, casting definitely proved critical.

Maria Bermudez

Maria Bermudez

“One of the mistakes I’ve seen with dance-theater is to have the dancers act or have the actors dance. This is totally detrimental to both genres,” says the 51-year-old flamenco artist. “So I said, ‘Let’s get actors with movement experience and I will create a choreography for them that’s accessible, so they can be these middle-aged people who are there to connect with something interior rather than with an exterior aesthetic.”

At a recent rehearsal, Bermudez’s choreography seemed to function almost as another character in the play, especially during the scene in which Rochelle first visits the flamenco class. As Katarina, Bermudez conducts a class warm-up, instructing her students to lift their arms, “touch the stars” and twirl their wrists, a motion that becomes an effective unison phrase.

Both as choreographer and performer, Bermudez has the task of conveying the flamenco class as a sacred space where women of all backgrounds can unleash their demons as a means of liberating their spirits. “For me, flamenco is about this universal cry, whether you are Jewish or African American, it is the same,” she says in a phone conversation after the rehearsal. “Pain has no color or creed.”

Shirley Jo Finney

Shirley Jo Finney

The notion of flamenco’s universal accessibility has always resonated with Finney, who collaborated with Bermudez a decade ago on developing a still unproduced, flamenco-based play called “Cry,” which sought parallels between flamenco and the blues. “What I love about ‘Heart Song’ is that it shows how interconnected we all are. Often women’s plays are very ethnic-specific, but in this piece, you see these different tribes and how they become a collective,” she says.

Rochelle (Pamela Dunlap) takes her first flamenco class.

Rochelle (Pamela Dunlap) takes her first flamenco class.

For Finney and her cast, the process of practicing flamenco combined with excavating the life and death themes in Sachs’ script has made for an intensely emotional experience. “In the cast we have cancer survivors, we have people who just lost their mothers,” observes Finney. “We rehearse some of these scenes and I have to say, ‘OK ladies, we got our cry. Now we have to stop and work on the script.’ Mothers and daughters, survivors and life, these have been our discussions.”

Dunlap, for example, can fully relate to Rochelle’s reckoning with her mother’s death. “The relationship with her mother was barren and the relationship I had with my mother was difficult,” says the actress, who can also be seen on “Mad Men” as Betty Draper’s formidable mother-in-law. “It is not infrequent for a play to strike a personal chord with its actors, but in this play … we are blown away by material which touches our personal lives.”

Ultimately, Sachs hopes his play and its many layers of meaning will find a “crossover audience. It would be wonderful if all our audiences came together for a shared experience,” he says. “Hopefully, it will open people’s eyes to what flamenco really is and maybe they will want to take a class themselves.”

Susan Josephs writes for the Los Angeles Times.

Heart Song May 25 – July 14 (323) 663-1525  MORE

‘Forever Flamenco at the Ford’ to Shine as Once-in-a-Lifetime Flamenco Gala Event on June 15

Maria Bermudez

Maria Bermudez

The Fountain Theatre presents an all-star line-up of local, national and international flamenco artists to celebrate Forever Flamenco!  founder Deborah Lawlor’s 20-year dedication to producing, nurturing and broadening the art form in Los Angeles. Forever Flamenco! at the Fordunder the artistic direction of internationally renowned flamenco dancer Maria Bermudez, takes place on SaturdayJune 15 at 8:30 pm at the Ford Theatres in Hollywood.

We have saved the BEST SEATS IN THE HOUSE for you! Our Fountain VIP patrons! Click here for more info! See details below!

Since 1990, the dancers, musicians and singers ofForever Flamenco! have been delighting Fountain Theatre audiences with the intensity, precision and exhilaration for which flamenco is known. NowForever Flamenco! returns to the outdoor stage at the Ford Theatres with this passionate expression of Spanish culture in a tribute to Lawlor.

Fanny Ara

Fanny Ara

Forever Flamenco! was born out of Deborah’s love and total immersion into flamenco,” says Bermudez. “Young dancers, up-and-coming dancers, seasoned professionals and international dancers – all of us have all come through Forever Flamenco! at the Fountain. I took my first baby steps there.”

Forever Flamenco! at the Ford will be a once-in-a-lifetime gala event gathering some of flamenco’s finest artists together on stage for the first time, including dancers Fanny Ara, Lakshmi BasileMaria BermudezAlejandro Granados (from Spain), Manuel GutierrrezTimo Nuñez,Linda Vega and Yaelisa; singer/dancer Roberto Amaral; singers José CortezAna de los Reyes (from Spain) and Jesus Montoya; singer/composer Pele de los Reyes (from Spain) of the Grammy®-nominated group Navajita Platea; guitarists Adam del MonteJason MaguireAntonio Triana and Ben Woods; and percussionist Joey Heredia. Watch for more surprise artists, as well as a few guests from Bermudez’ flamenco puro company Sonidos Gitanos, which has been presented at the Ford by Lawlor and the Fountain eight times since 1995.

timo

Timo Nunez

Deborah Lawlor

Deborah Lawlor

Deborah Lawlor’s Forever Flamenco! series plays monthly to enthusiastic crowds at the Fountain Theatre. She and the Fountain have presented Bermudez and her Sonidos Gitanos/Gypsy Flamenco Company from Jerez de la Frontera, Spain, for eight summer engagements at the Ford – including, in 2010, its new off-shoot, The Chicana Gypsy Project – and in 2007 at the Japan American Theatre. The 2009 Ford season included Forever Flamenco!: LA Olé featuring an all-star cast assembled fromForever Flamenco! at the Fountain. Lawlor began her career as a dancer, choreographer and actor in New York’s “downtown” scene. After living in South India for five years, where she was involved in the initial development of the international township of Auroville, she created two full-length outdoor dance/theater pieces celebrating the community. She spent the next 10 years in Australia and France studying ancient cultures of India and Egypt and translating several books in these fields from French into English. Returning to the U.S. in 1986, she became deeply involved in the intimate theater scene and, in 1990, she and Stephen Sachs co-founded the Fountain Theatre, which is now in its 23rd season of theatrical and dance events. Lawlor is responsible for the Fountain’s extensive dance involvement. The 1995 season included The Women of Guernica, Lawlor’s flamenco-based adaptation of Euripides’ The Trojan Women, which she also directed. She directed two one-act plays by Tennessee Williams and created and directed three full-evening dance-theater pieces for the Fountain:Declarations: Love Letters of the Great RomanticsThe Path of Love, which she also directed in South Indiaand the dance opera, The Song of Songs, with music by Al Carmines. Actors Equity Association honored Lawlor with its Diversity Award, for her dedication to presenting work at the Fountain that is culturally diverse.

Maria Bermudez

Maria Bermudez

Considered to be one of the foremost international flamenco artists in the world today, Bermudez resides in Jerez de la Frontera, Spain, the “birthplace” of flamenco. There, she has worked with renowned artists such as Juana del Pipa, Andres Peña, Antonio El Pipa, Alejandro Granados, Navajita Platea, El Capullo and many others. She was honored by the artists of the city for her relentless dedication in exposing the artistry of this region. Bermudez’ outstanding and critically acclaimed performances include the Hollywood Bowl, Ford Amphitheatre, Fountain Theater and the Music Center in Los Angeles; Central Park, Lincoln Center and the Joyce Theater in New York City; the Teatro Palácio das Artes in Brazil; Peña Cernicalos, Los Gallos and Teatro Lope de Vega and Festival de Jerez in Spain; guest appearances with the Santa Cecilia California; and numerous venues throughout the world. Most recently she formed Chicana Gypsy Project which draws on her Mexican-American heritage and her immersion into Adulucian Gypsy culture. Her life and career have inspired the award-winning documentary film, Streets of Flamenco.

Forever Flamenco! at the Ford takes place on Saturday, June 15. Doors open for picnicking at 6:30 pm and the show starts at 8:30 pm. Reserved seating is $50 and $75.Purchase tickets on or before June 8 and save $5. Tickets are available at www.FordTheatres.org or 323 461-3673 (for non-visual media 323 GO 1-FORD). 

We are holding 100 of the BEST SEATS — center section, down front, up close and personal  — and are offering them only to you, our private Fountain VIP patrons.  These prime seats are not available to the public. With these VIP tickets you get:

  • The best seats in the house: down front, up close, center section
  • Exclusive VIP pass to the private pre-show catered party with the artists
  • Festive hand-crafted gift bag with free flamenco swag

These prime VIP TICKETS are only available through the Fountain Theatre!    Order Now!  Or call the Fountain box office (323) 663-1525.

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